Traumatic Brain Injury Blog

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Tagged with “Depression”

May 21, 2014

Neuroendocrine Dysfunction following Traumatic Brain Injury: Could This be a Key to More Successful Treatment?

Recent research has shown that traumatic brain injury, (TBI) including mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI),  can damage and cause dysfunction in the pituitary gland, a pea-sized gland located in the center of the skull that releases several essential hormones affecting such functions as growth and metabolism (part of the neuroendocrine system).  Researchers have found that a surprisingly high percentage of patients with persistent symptoms following a TBI show evidence of neuroendocrine dysfunction.

It turns out that the anatomy of this gland makes it particularly susceptible to the sheering injuries seen in TBI. The most common dysfunction found after TBI is deficiency in the Growth Hormone (GH), one of the key hormones released by the pituitary gland. The symptoms of GH deficiency overlap with many persistent TBI symptoms including fatigue, poor memory, depression, emotional lability, lack of concentration and attention difficulties. Read More

March 3, 2014

The Power of Mindfulness

I travel between two worlds that may appear far apart – by day I am a trial lawyer with a focus on traumatic brain injury; nights and weekends I am a yoga teacher. I increasingly find that these worlds are very close together.

As a brain injury lawyer I work with people struggling to recover from the loss of sense of self so often caused by brain injury as well as associated depression and chronic pain. Many of my clients have reported meaningful increases in the quality of their lives following injury through “mindfulness” practices such as yoga and meditation. Practices such as yoga are designed to increase awareness of the present moment, to increase awareness of our thoughts, emotions and physical sensations without filtering them through past experience or fears of the future – to recapture our sense of ourselves. Read More

June 11, 2013

Bright Light Therapy Shows Promise in Promoting Recovery from Mild TBI

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine has announced the results of a recent study showing that bright light therapy following Mild TBI (concussion) may improve sleep, cognitive and brain function.  The study results were presented at the June 3, 2013 meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC and published in an online supplement to the journal Sleep.     Read More

June 11, 2013

Sex after a Traumatic Brain Injury

The topic of sexual dysfunction after a traumatic brain injury shouldn’t be taboo. Millions of people in the United States live with the physical, cognitive and emotional consequences traumatic brain injury (TBI). Sexuality is often impacted, but not often discussed or addressed. Failure to address this issue can compound the adverse effect of TBI symptoms on important relationships and self-esteem.  NeuroRehabilitation: An International Journal recently published a critical review of fourteen studies on this topic. Read More

May 9, 2013

The “Show Me” Jury Challenge | Proving TBI to a jury

We live in a world of “show me” juries, programmed to believe that most people bringing personal injury claims to trial are trying to get something for nothing. They want to be convincingly shown that a real injury exists—that the injured person can prove a brain injury or other debilitating condition.

Proving a Mild Traumatic Brain Injury to a Jury

For example, some brain injuries produce bleeding in the brain that clearly shows up on conventional diagnostic images like CT scans—computerized tomography that combines a series of X-ray views taken from many different angles and processed by a computer to create cross-sectional images of the bones and soft tissues inside your body—and/or MRIs—magnetic resonance imaging that uses a magnetic field and radio waves to create detailed images of the organs and tissues within your body—or, that produce visible  neurological signs like seizures,  visual problems, speech problems, or motor problems.

Proving a brain injury to a jury where visible evidence is available is not difficult. However, we know that many mild traumatic brain injuries are “invisible” to these standard tests, yet are serious enough to greatly impact quality of life. In these cases, the challenge is to help the jury understand those long-term consequences, even when the injury is not visible.

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