Traumatic Brain Injury Blog

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Tagged with “Chronic disorders”

April 8, 2015

New Study Shows that Brain Injury May Accelerate Aging

A new study published in the Annals of Neurology – the official journal of the American Neurological Association – adds further evidence in support of our growing understanding that TBI, especially moderate/severe TBI or repetitive mild TBI, often triggers a “progressive neurodegenerative process” that accelerates over time. As discussed in prior posts, TBI is now conceptualized as potentially a chronic disease triggered by injury, not as an isolated event. Hopefully this understanding will lead in the future to interventions designed to halt or slow the disease process.

The recent study, published in the April 2015 issue, reports on the results of research at the Imperial College London, where brain scans of over 1500 healthy people were  analyzed to develop a computer program that could predict a person’s age from their brain scan. The program was then  used to estimate the “brain age” of 113 more healthy people and 99 people who had suffered TBIs. The brains of the TBI patients were on average five years older than their real age would predict. Read More

August 27, 2013

Growing Support for Treating TBI as a Chronic Disease

Two recent peer reviewed papers support the position statement adopted by the Brain Injury Association in 2009 that “Brain Injury” be treated not as static event from which patients gradually recover over time, but as the beginning of a disease process that that can cause symptoms that change over time, in some cases getting worse instead of better, and that can impact multiple organ systems. 

The good news is that most people do, in fact, recover. For those who do not, however, the disease model is more consistent with the evolving research. As McCrea, Iverson, McAllister, et. al. noted in their 2009 Integrated Review of Recovery after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury, brain injury science has advanced more in the last few years than in the previous 50, causing us to change the paradigms we have used to understand both the injury and its consequences.  Read More

May 30, 2013

Study Shows Brain Atrophy following “Mild” Traumatic Brain Injury

Further evidence that the term “mild” should never be used in connection with brain injury can be found in a study published in the March 2013 issue of the Journal Radiology

In the study, NYU medical school researchers measured changes in global and regional brain volume over a one year period in 30 patients with “mild” traumatic brain injuries and typical post-injury symptoms including anxiety, depression and fatigue, and other symptoms such as headache, dizziness and perceived cognitive problems. 

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May 15, 2013

Reconciling “ Who I Am Now” with “Who I Used to Be”

The human brain is complex. Every brain injury is unique. But nearly every person who suffers a brain injury experiences that frightening feeling of  “I am not myself anymore.” In mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) cases, specifically, this feeling may recede over a period of weeks or months. But for others, it does not.

Whether the symptoms are permanent, improve, or get worse, the reasons for these differences are constantly researched—looking for ways to explain, prevent, and/or heal traumatic brain injuries. Several new studies on mild brain injury are examining factors ranging from genetic differences to differences in emotional make-up in order to understand why these differences exist. New research is leading to new approaches in treatment and rehabilitation, as well as prevention.

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